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Day 8–No Response from CUNY Union Pres.

Tuesday at 3:40 p.m. I sent an open letter to Barbara Bowen, president of the Professional Staff Congress, CUNY’s union, with the subject line “Open letter re your De Blasio statement & your exclusion of adjuncts and graduate student workers.” I copied the union’s first vice-president, treasurer, vice-president for part-time personnel, and executive director on the email, all people we Adjunct Project coordinators have worked with, or attempted to work with, this academic year. I also copied 11 of the 12 members of the newly reconstituted (and elected) Graduate Center chapter slate, omitting one member because I couldn’t find an email for that person. Finally, I copied two higher education officers (HEOs) at the Graduate Center, one of whom is a cross-campus officer on the executive council of the union, both of whom, working together, put together the Graduate Center slate (with no input solicited from the Adjunct Project).

There have been three responses from these 18 people to date, the most recent of which came from a member of the Graduate Center chapter slate, Michelle Fine, who emailed Saturday that she was speaking with graduate students, adjuncts, and other members of the slate about the issues raised in the open letter. We welcomed this info. (See a previous update for details of the two earlier responses.)

Additionally, another member of the Graduate Center chapter slate, Michelle Chen, who was not among the original recipients of the letter because I couldn’t find her email address, has signed the letter.

Today we posted to additional statements of support for the letter campaign, the first from longtime CUNY adjunct Harry T. Cason, the second from Adjunct Project coordinator for labor relations Luke Elliott. Cason’s statement, his second in support of the letter campaign, is in response to union executive council member Michael Batson’s statement of Friday, while Elliott’s responds partially to Batson’s as well as the two other statements from executive council members we’ve received.

I am now sending the letter again to the aforementioned recipients, plus Chen (as I now have her email address), along with the names and affiliations of the 159 signers.

The union leaders and chapter leaders are supposed to represent us. It’s not the other way around.

Read and sign the letter here, or leave a comment here with your name and affiliation (if you have one).

There are now 159 of us, from across CUNY and the U.S., inside and outside of higher ed.

A Note on Method 5/20

We didn’t initially post union executive council member Michael Batson’s response to the open letter because he was not one of the original recipients of the open letter, but we distributed it via the Adjunct Project listserv and the national contingent-academics listserv on Friday, May 16.
Batson’s response, however, has spurred a response by longtime CUNY adjunct Harry T. Cason, who previously offered this statement in support of the letter campaign. And Luke Elliott, Adjunct Project coordinator for labor relations, responds in part to Batson as well. Accordingly, we posted Batson’s response today.
To sign the open letter, go here.

Response to Open Letter by Adjunct Project Coordinator for Labor Relations

Fellow Union Members—

It has been exciting and educational to follow the conversation surrounding the open letter to Barbara Bowen, the president of our union, the Professional Staff Congress. It is clear from the many positive responses and the few negative ones that the letter has tapped into a vital energy and frustration—at this writing more than 150 people have signed on. Moreover, the letter has sparked a campaign to turn our union’s symbolic commitment to a $5,000/course starting salary for Adjuncts into a material commitment at the bargaining table (sign the petition here!). I can hardly think of a better outcome of an open letter, whatever exactly its tone.

Perhaps what I find most interesting are the understandably defensive responses to the letter from several members of our union’s New Caucus leadership.* These responses strike me as useful reminders of the fact that our union leadership is progressive and has won some fights for and with Adjuncts. I am sympathetic to this case and have been around the labor movement long enough to know that even leadership with the best politics is often caught between the rock of the boss and the hard place of labor law. In short, I have genuine empathy for the circumstances faced by our union leadership.

But I have also been around the labor movement long enough to know that some leaders are excited and inspired by rank-and-file organizing, while others feel threatened by it. If we at CUNY are going not just to slow or to halt but rather to reverse and ultimately break the two-tier “adjunctified” system under which we labor, it is going to take deep and creative organizing. To start with the basics, somewhere between 20 and 25% PSCers have not even signed a union card. There are nearly 5,000 people covered by our contract who have not taken the first step toward participating in the union. The lack of urgency to engage these potential members—who are, in all likelihood, not apathetic but rather the most vulnerable and least represented among us—is disturbing.

Moreover, the open letter references a modest proposal put forward by Graduate Assistants and Adjuncts, requesting that they have flexibility in which PSC Chapter they join. This proposal has sat on the table for months without a substantive response from the leadership. One begins to develop the impression that when Adjuncts attempt to address the issues they face, it is viewed as a hijacking of the time needed to deal with “real” union issues. In fact, the issues faced by Adjuncts are central to reversing the “adjunctification” of CUNY. Simply put, Adjuncts must be so organized, so angry and so prepared to better their conditions that the two-tier system becomes untenable—indeed $5k/course or, even better, full parity would obviously help to incentivize CUNY to transform contingent labor into full time positions.

I sincerely hope that the New Caucus leadership has the tenacity, the open-mindedness and the creativity to make serious strides in reversing the two-tier system. Sean Kennedy, who drafted the initial open letter, has taken to signing his emails “Rank-and-file union democracy now!” If we are going to tackle the issues at hand, this prospect must be as exciting to the New Caucus leadership as it is to the many PSC members who have endorsed the open letter and the campaign for $5k.

In earnest,

Luke Elliott, PSC member; labor relations coordinator, The Adjunct Project; PhD student, sociology

*For those new to the PSC, unions are required by federal law to have elections every three years. Caucuses are essentially political parties within the union that run for offices in these elections. Our current leadership comes from the New Caucus, which took control of the union starting in 2000.

[To sign the open letter, go here.]

A Long-Time Adjunct’s Response to Executive Council Member Statement

Mike believes that our present Union leadership wants to do away with the two-tier labor system at CUNY, and for that matter the two-tier system in the American University system as a whole. I too do not doubt this.

But what does doing away with the two tier system mean for this leadership and what would it mean for adjuncts?

Well, the answer is nobody really knows. We do not talk about it, say, at Delegate Assembly meetings, because our leadership has never brought it up. Since there are so many other more important matters concerning full-timers (the real university), we just have not had the time.

True, we followers are somewhat to blame for this subject being ignored, but….we are, after all, just followers. I believe the rules are to look at the leadership, if we must insist in continuing to play this right-wing game known as liberal democracy.

I have complained for years over the lack of democratic inclusion in our Union, and this is a prime example. The silence has been deafening.

Fusion (for those who know what this was) is another example of where a lack of democratic participatory opportunity once again reined over our heads. This project so potentially dear to all adjuncts was again begun, done and failed in quiet anonymity. Mike, why do you tout this failure?

Now as far as the PSC leadership’s valiant fight to maintain health insurance is concerned, if this Union cannot maintain the one serious benefit adjuncts have (which by the way only 12-15% of us obtain), then you guys should just hang up your hats.

Mike you also speak of the time and energy put into keeping adjunct concerns before the administration. But if this minimalist goal cannot be done (reminding the admin that we still exist), then what else would there be to do for adjuncts?

Yes, collecting data on the releasing of adjuncts could be useful, Mike, but what useful thing came of it, and what would the leadership do if they found something disturbing?

Now let’s get serious. What about the fight over Pathways, and how the PSC leadership denied adjuncts the right to vote on the issue of “no confidence.” This was an opportunity to root out some of that apathy to which you refer. But instead, you supported adjuncts not being included. Well, so much for democratic inclusion.

And what about the strict enforcement of the 9/6 rule? You admit yourself that it was a big mistake, but then suggest in the next line that maybe it was not that bad. However, I am sure you know that the very few conversion lines that came through for adjuncts did not come as a result of the 9/6 debacle.

Mike, you also suggest that the PSC leadership did not choose the historical moment we are presently living through, and this is true. But I have pushed for 15 years the idea that the PSC needs to go on a serious ideological offensive. We (excuse me – the Union leadership) have incredible resources at their finger tips, but these resources remain silent and unused.

Numerous concrete suggestions I and others have made have been simply ignored. In fact a number of full timers have left the Union because of this. And this is particularly why I cannot take this leadership serious or believe in their sincerity regarding adjuncts.

I love you Mike because you are a fellow being, a brother, but I do not appreciate your political actions.

Harry T. Cason, adjunct, College of Staten Island, CUNY

[To sign the open letter, go here.]

Union Executive Council Member Responds to Open Letter

As a long-serving adjunct, I share frustration at our continued contingent condition.

Even after 15 years of service with an excellent reputation amongst students and colleagues, I worry at the end of each semester whether I will have enough work in the next semester to make the bills. At this very moment I am watching the enrollment numbers for a summer course I am scheduled to teach, anxious that it won’t reach the magic and mysterious cut-off level, and wondering what I will do if it doesn’t run. But to blame the PSC leadership for this state of affairs is both unfounded and unfair. It is one thing to disagree on strategy, but to accuse this leadership (and Barbara personally) of “neglect of us and our issues” is unjustifiable. It is also sad, as the leadership shares the same exact goal of the overwhelming majority of adjuncts: to do away with this horrible two-tier system. My experience as a member of the PSC’s EC and bargaining team has richly illustrated Barbara’s and more generally the principal officers’ commitment to part-time faculty equity. Their commitment (both professional and personal) to this can be seen through the time, energy, and resources that have been allocated to adjunct equity.

Take adjunct health care as an example: while the issue is not resolved, what has been achieved so far is quite astonishing. The $10 million allocated to CUNY adjunct health care was not a gift from on high, but rather was the culmination of a decades-long struggle by this PSC leadership to get CUNY to acknowledge and accept some responsibility for the large cohort of permanent part-timers. Anyone who has been around a while knows how resistant CUNY administration has been to even acknowledging our existence. This happened because of a sustained campaign to keep adjunct issues on CUNY’s radar. Almost every conversation with CUNY incorporated adjuncts in some way. CUNY as a consequence expended quite a bit of political capital to get this done with public decision-makers. When that wasn’t enough, the PSC leadership negotiated contributions from CUNY to make up the difference. To do so required an incredible amount of preparation to come up with precise eligibility numbers and costing estimates. To get as far as we have on this has also taken an extraordinary amount of time, energy, focus, and resources. This is complex work that has produced tangible, concrete benefit. Equally important, it has taken up a substantial part of Barbara’s and the other leaders’ time. Importantly, it is but one of many concrete, tangible pieces of evidence demonstrating the union’s commitment to producing results on matters of equity. In the meantime, the PSC leadership arranged several extensions for those adjuncts receiving health insurance from the welfare fund.

Just to give a bit of perspective, I looked over my calendar for the initial meetings on this issue from Spring of 2012. From April through early June, the adjunct health care subcommittee met 11 times for a total of 23 hours (including preparation meetings, meetings with CUNY, and meetings with the city). This does not include the many, many hours individuals put into preparing the numbers and arguments for each meeting.

Or take the Spring of 2010 as word began to filter back that adjuncts were being let go due to departmental budget cuts. The PSC leadership undertook a massive effort to find out what was going on, in order to determine how best to respond. That project began with Barbara sending out an email and a letter to each and every chair in CUNY asking them to respond to a questionnaire (she personally signed approximately 365 letters). Every department then received a phone call asking about the impact of the budget on their department, primarily the impact on adjunct retention. This data was collected and put in a report that was then presented to the D.A. Again Barbara, and more generally the PSC leadership, invested substantial amounts of time, energy, and resources on behalf of adjunct equity.

I could go on to list the gains that have been made by this leadership (paid office hours, 200 conversion lines, salaries in the last contract that tilted towards the most vulnerable and lowest paid, Professional Development Grants, the FUSE project, etc.). Has all this brought equality? Of course it has not produced such an outcome. But has this work and the contract gains made a real difference in the lives of adjuncts? Absolutely. I could just as easily criticize the leadership for their missteps. How they handled the 9/6 rule crackdown was a huge mistake; but such criticism has to do with how they responded to CUNY’s wantonly violating the contract, and not of their character or concern for adjuncts. (In fact, even here their response is a slightly mixed bag, for on my campus several adjuncts who lost the ability to do overloads are now full-time lecturers due to the conversion lines).

If we look at the current contract demands, we can see that it is based on balancing the needs of the different parts of the bargaining unit. It was constructed from what was essentially a “listening tour” at by the principal officers back in 2010 (maybe 2011), and is guided by solidarity. They heard that adjuncts want security and so that is one of the pillars of the demands.

Any analysis that leaves out the historical and political context in which we operate is unsound. Any analysis that ignores the balance of power in our current system easily leads to making enemies of friends. Sometimes movements have the wind at their backs. At this point in time, it is all headwinds for the labor movement. The PSC has not chosen this particular historical moment, but it does all it can to resist the worst aspects of a neoliberal agenda which aims to privatize and corporatize all that is public, and to turn all workers into mere commodities. It is one thing to disagree with a chosen strategy or particular policy–strategies and policies ultimately decided on by at the D.A.; it is another to attack the commitment and character of people who spend a great deal of their time and energy fighting for our rights. The people being accused of sycophancy of the Democratic Mayor are the very same people that participated in civil disobedience against our Democratic Governor. These are the complex on the ground facts associated with the struggle to produce change.

While adjuncts have every reason to be upset, anxious, and frustrated, I believe that directing it at the PSC leadership is both misplaced and counterproductive. Full-timers, and more largely the PSC, are not the enemy. Those that wish to prostrate all labor and to privatize all that is public are the enemy. Those who wish to narrow our student’s education to serve only the interests of corporate America, to turn them into good workers while ignoring the importance of turning them into good citizens are the enemy. Those that want to plunder the public’s wealth to fill the private coffers of the privileged are the enemy. Apathy is the enemy (in CSI’s recent Chapter election, one that turned largely on which slate would better represent adjuncts, less than 20% of eligible adjuncts voted; in the recent election for adjunct rep on the college council, 8.7% of eligible adjuncts voted; at the May 1st marched behind a banner reading “5K per course for Contingent Faculty,” very few of the 12,000 adjuncts that would benefit from that appeared. It should be noted, meanwhile, that many full-timers and retirees were there).

Finally, I noticed that any and all “investments” won should go to adjuncts and graduate students. That doesn’t sound like solidarity to me. What about the many junior faculty hired after 2009 who have never seen a raise? What about HEO assistants? What about CLT’s? Could you be accused of ignoring their plight?

Eugene Deb’s asked and important question in his essay Labor Omnia Vincit:

“Why is it that labor does not conquer anything? Why does it not assert its mighty power? Why does it not rule in congress, in legislatures and in courts? I answer because it is factionized, because it will not unify, because, for some inscrutable reason, it prefers division, weakness and slavery, rather than unity, strength and victory.”

 I for one will continue to resist dividing the collective at such a critical moment. We are either all in this together or we will all surely lose. Solidarity does not mean we must all agree on every point, but it does require that we stop making personal attacks and seeing every point of disagreement as betrayal.

Sincerely yours in Solidarity,

Michael Batson, adjunct lecturer and part-time personnel officer, executive council, PSC

[To sign the open letter, go here.]

Day 7–No Response from CUNY Union Pres.

Tuesday at 3:40 p.m. I sent an open letter to Barbara Bowen, president of the Professional Staff Congress, CUNY’s union, with the subject line “Open letter re your De Blasio statement & your exclusion of adjuncts and graduate student workers.” I copied the union’s first vice-president, treasurer, vice-president for part-time personnel, and executive director on the email, all people we Adjunct Project coordinators have worked with, or attempted to work with, this academic year. I also copied 11 of the 12 members of the newly reconstituted (and elected) Graduate Center chapter slate, omitting one member because I couldn’t find an email for that person. Finally, I copied two higher education officers (HEOs) at the Graduate Center, one of whom is a cross-campus officer on the executive council of the union, both of whom, working together, put together the Graduate Center slate (with no input solicited from the Adjunct Project).

There have been three responses from these 18 people to date, the most recent of which came from a member of the Graduate Center chapter slate, Michelle Fine, who emailed Saturday that she was speaking with graduate students, adjuncts, and other members of the slate about the issues raised in the open letter. We welcomed this info. (See a previous update for details of the two earlier responses.)

Additionally, another member of the Graduate Center chapter slate, Michelle Chen, who was not among the original recipients of the letter because I couldn’t find her email address, has signed the letter.

I am now sending the letter again to the aforementioned recipients, plus Chen (as I now have her email address), along with the names and affiliations of the 155 signers.

The union leaders and chapter leaders are supposed to represent us. It’s not the other way around.

Read and sign the letter here, or leave a comment here with your name and affiliation (if you have one).

There are now 155 of us, from across CUNY and the U.S., inside and outside of higher ed.

Day 6–No Response from CUNY Union Pres.

Tuesday at 3:40 p.m. I sent an open letter to Barbara Bowen, president of the Professional Staff Congress, CUNY’s union, with the subject line “Open letter re your De Blasio statement & your exclusion of adjuncts and graduate student workers.” I copied the union’s first vice-president, treasurer, vice-president for part-time personnel, and executive director on the email, all people we Adjunct Project coordinators have worked with, or attempted to work with, this academic year. I also copied 11 of the 12 members of the newly reconstituted (and elected) Graduate Center chapter slate, omitting one member because I couldn’t find an email for that person. Finally, I copied two higher education officers (HEOs) at the Graduate Center, one of whom is a cross-campus officer on the executive council of the union, both of whom, working together, put together the Graduate Center slate (with no input solicited from the Adjunct Project).

There have been three responses from these 18 people to date, the most recent of which came from a member of the Graduate Center chapter slate, Michelle Fine, who emailed yesterday that she was speaking with graduate students, adjuncts, and other members of the slate about the issues raised in the open letter. We welcomed this info. (See a previous update for details of the two earlier responses.)

Additionally, another member of the Graduate Center chapter slate, Michelle Chen, who was not among the original recipients of the letter because I couldn’t find her email address, has signed the letter.

I am now sending the letter again to the aforementioned recipients, plus Chen (as I now have her email address), along with the names and affiliations of the 153 signers.

The union leaders and chapter leaders are supposed to represent us. It’s not the other way around.

Read and sign the letter here, or leave a comment here with your name and affiliation (if you have one).

There are now 153 of us, from across CUNY and the U.S., inside and outside of higher ed.

Day 5–No Response from CUNY Union Pres.

Tuesday at 3:40 p.m. I sent an open letter to Barbara Bowen, president of the Professional Staff Congress, CUNY’s union, with the subject line “Open letter re your De Blasio statement & your exclusion of adjuncts and graduate student workers.” I copied the union’s first vice-president, treasurer, vice-president for part-time personnel, and executive director on the email, all people we Adjunct Project coordinators have worked with, or attempted to work with, this academic year. I also copied 11 of the 12 members of the newly reconstituted (and elected) Graduate Center chapter slate, omitting one member because I couldn’t find an email for that person. Finally, I copied two higher education officers (HEOs) at the Graduate Center, one of whom is a cross-campus officer on the executive council of the union, both of whom, working together, put together the Graduate Center slate (with no input solicited from the Adjunct Project).

There have been two responses from these 18 people to date (see the last update for details).

Additionally, a member of the Graduate Center chapter slate, who was not one of the recipients of the letter because I couldn’t find her email address, has signed the letter.

I am now sending the letter again to the aforementioned recipients, plus the Graduate Center chapter slate member who signed the letter (as I now have her email address), along with the names and affiliations of the 147 signers.

The union leaders and chapter leaders are supposed to represent us. It’s not the other way around.

Read and sign the letter here, or leave a comment here, or email me at kennedy [dot] sean [at] gmail [dot] com.

There are now 147 of us, from across CUNY and the U.S., inside and outside of higher ed.

$5K Per Course Must Be Bottom-Line Contract Demand

What is needed is to take steps that concretely improve the situation of the majority of the instructional staff suffering the effects of the two-tier labor system. The Professional Staff Congress has formally endorsed the national campaign calling for a minimum starting salary of $5000 per three-credit semester course. We hereby call on the PSC leadership to make a formal commitment that the $5K demand will be a bottom-line demand in the current contract negotiations. Any proposed contract that does not include this should be rejected out of hand.

We invite all our fellow union members to sign and help circulate this call.

To sign this call, leave a comment here with your name and CUNY affiliation(s). Thanks!

Signed by:

Makeba Lavan, Graduate Center, CUNY

Erica Chutuape, Hunter College, CUNY

Sándor John, Hunter College, CUNY

Jennifer Chancellor, Graduate Center, CUNY

Sean M. Kennedy, Graduate Center, CUNY

Luke Elliott, Graduate Center, CUNY

Cindy Gorn, CUNY

James D. Hoff, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Elizabeth Bidwell Goetz, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Rafael A. Mutis​, Hostos Community College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Velina Manolova, Graduate Center, CUNY

Elizabeth Sibilia, Graduate Center, CUNY

Wendy Tronrud, Graduate Center, CUNY

Dadland Maye, Graduate Center, CUNY

Öykü Tekten, Graduate Center, CUNY

R. Josh Scannell, Graduate Center, CUNY

Preeti Sampat, Graduate Center, CUNY

Peter Matt, Brooklyn College, CUNY

Debangshu Roychoudhury, Graduate Center, CUNY

Monique Whitaker, Hunter College, CUNY

Jennifer Prince, Graduate Center, CUNY

Esther Bernstein, Graduate Center, CUNY

Héctor Agredano, City College, Bronx Community College, and Graduate Center, CUNY

Collette Sosnowy, JustPublics@365, Graduate Center, CUNY

Megan Paslawski, Graduate Center, CUNY

Kristen Hackett, Graduate Center, CUNY

Fang Xu, Lehman College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Christina Nadler, Graduate Center, CUNY

Kristin Moriah, Graduate Center, CUNY

James Anthony Phillips, Kingsborough Community College, CUNY

Tristan K. Husby, City College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Erin Michaels, Graduate Center, CUNY

Cameron Pearson, Queens College, CUNY

David Tillyer, City College, CUNY

Amy Martin, Graduate Center, CUNY

Colin P. Ashley, Doctoral Students’ Council Co-Chair for Business, Graduate Center, CUNY

Ian Foster, Graduate Center, CUNY

Melissa Phruksachart, Graduate Center, CUNY

Maureen E. Fadem, Kingsborough Community College, CUNY

Alec Magnet, Graduate Center, CUNY

Erin M. Andersen, Graduate Center, CUNY

Ashna Ali, Graduate Center, CUNY

Michael A. Rumore, Graduate Center, CUNY

Conor Tomás Reed, Medgar Evers College and Graduate Center, CUNY; Free University-NYC

Kathryn Moss, Graduate Center, CUNY

David Spataro, Graduate Center, CUNY

Kenneth H. Ryesky, Queens College, CUNY

Alan Trevithick, La Guardia Community College, CUNY

Ann Kottner, York College, CUNY

Mary Carroll, Lehman College, CUNY

Linda Neiberg, Baruch College, CUNY

Brian Unger, Graduate Center, CUNY

Ian Green, Graduate Center, CUNY

Eric Lott, Graduate Center, CUNY

John Sorrentino, John Jay College, CUNY

Allison E. Brown, Graduate Center, CUNY

Rayya El Zein, Medgar Evers College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Melissa K. Marturano, Brooklyn College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Dominique Nisperos, Graduate Center, CUNY

Amanda Matles, Graduate Center, CUNY

Lavelle Porter, City Tech and  Graduate Center, CUNY

Lauren Tenley, College of Staten Island, CUNY

Mary N. Taylor, Graduate Center, CUNY

Edwin Mayorga, Graduate Center, CUNY

Charlotte Thurston, Graduate Center, CUNY

Robin Hizme, Queens College, CUNY

Wilson Sherwin, Brooklyn College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Mark Drury, Graduate Center, CUNY

Anton Borst, Hunter College, Graduate Center, CUNY

Jason Schulman, Lehman College, CUNY

Wilma Borrelli, Lehman College, CUNY

Daniel Nieves, City College and Lehman College, CUNY

Maria L. Plochocki, Baruch and College Now, CUNY

Sara Jane Stoner, Graduate Center, CUNY

Anna Gjika, Graduate Center, CUNY

Alicia Andrzejewski, Graduate Center, CUNY

Paul Hebert, Queens College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Patrick Reilly, Baruch College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Kara Van Cleaf, Graduate Center, CUNY

Harry T. Cason, College of Staten Island, CUNY

Kylah Torre, Graduate Center, CUNY

Kate O’Donoghue, Queens College, CUNY

Karen Gregory, City College and Center for Worker Education, CUNY

Michael Friedman, Queens College, CUNY

Heather Heim, Lehman College, CUNY

Austin Bailey, Hunter College, CUNY

Leigh Somerville, Queens College, CUNY

Lindsey Freer, Macaulay Honors College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Lydia Pelot-Hobbs, Graduate Center, CUNY

Nathaniel Sheets,  Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Jonathan R. Davis, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Marga Ryersbach, Queensborough Community College, CUNY

Andrew Akinmoladun, Bronx Community College, CUNY

Thomas Smith, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Tyler T. Schmidt, Lehman College, CUNY

Sarah Davis, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Emily Nell, Graduate Center, CUNY

Brenden Beck, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Brandon Kreitler, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Aysenur Ataman, College of Staten Island and Graduate Center, CUNY

Anthony Galluzzo, Queens College, CUNY

David Parsons, Baruch College, CUNY

Kelly Eckenrode, Lehman College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Danny Sanchez, Queens College, CUNY

Michelle Chen, Graduate Center, CUNY

Jennifer Hayashida, Hunter College, CUNY

Hayley Figueroa, Brooklyn College,  CUNY

Arto Artinian, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Rebecca Fullan, Graduate Center, CUNY

Aaron Botwick, Graduate Center, CUNY

Gerhard Joseph, Lehman College, CUNY

A.W. Strouse, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Casandra Murray, Hunter College, CUNY

Luis H. Francia, Hunter College, CUNY

Noé Dinnerstein, John Jay College, CUNY

Douglas A. Medina, Baruch College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Peter Ranis, Graduate Center, CUNY

Jacquelyn Libby, Baruch College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Saadia Toor, College of Staten Island, CUNY

Howard Pflanzer, Bronx Community College, CUNY

Yvonne Groseil, Hunter College, CUNY

Iziar de Miguel, Graduate Center, CUNY

Jacqueline Libby, Graduate Center, CUNY

Patricia Winter, Graduate Center, CUNY

Lisa Karakaya, Graduate Center, CUNY

Genevieve Waite, Graduate Center, CUNY

Morgan Horowitz, Hunter College, CUNY

Morgan M.X. Schulz, Hunter College and Queens College, CUNY

Anne Donlon, Graduate Center, CUNY

Tom Buechele, Hunter College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Priya Chandrasekaran, Graduate Center, CUNY

Sujatha Fernandes, Queens College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Andy Battle, Graduate Center, CUNY

Tommy Mintz, Queens College and Kingsborough Community College, CUNY

Danielle Abrams, York College and College of Staten Island, CUNY

Tommy Wu, Queens College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Zach Geller, City College and Graduate Center, CUNY

Mary Roldan, Hunter College, CUNY

Natascia Boeri

Jen Tang, Graduate Center, CUNY

Marie Jasmine Narcisse, Graduate Center, CUNY

Tayt J. Harlin, Medgar Evers College, CUNY

Kathleen Rockwell Lawrence, Baruch College

Mariana Goycoechea, Graduate Center

Dana Loev Radu, Graduate Center

Timothy Wilson, Graduate Center

Antoinette Williams-Tutt, Graduate Center

Rupal Oza, Hunter College

Luis Alvarez, Africana & Puerto Rican/Latino Studies, Hunter College

Peter Dudek, Art, Hunter College

Robert Alpert, Film, Hunter College

Brian Herbert, CLT, Hunter College

Sarah Jeninsky, HEO, Hunter College

George Wallace, CLT, Hunter College

Gus Pita, HEO, Hunter College

Tamara Green, Classical & Oriental Studies, Hunter College

Rosa Alicia Ramos, Romance Languages, Hunter College

Maria LaRusso, Queens College presently at Hunter

Wei-Yi Cheng, Classical & Oriental Studies, Hunter College

Mary Anne Cartelli, Classical & Oriental Studies, Hunter College

Maria L. Fischer, Romance Languages, Hunter College

Magdalena Perkowska, Romance Languages, Hunter College

Paul McPherron, English, Hunter College

Lynn McCormick,  Urban Affairs, Hunter College

Melissa Haldeman, HEO, Urban Affairs, Hunter College

Jill Simone Gross, Urban Affairs, Hunter College

Karen Kern, History, Hunter College

Daniel Hurewitz, History, Hunter College

Angelo Angelis, History, Hunter College

Richard Belsky, History, Hunter College

Akiyo Furukawa, Classical & Oriental Studies, Hunter College

Maria Paynter, Romance Languages, Hunter College

Daniela D’Eugenio, Romance Languages, Hunter College [job title unknown]

Wilson Spencer, AFPRL, Hunter College

Claus Mueller, Sociology, Hunter College

Howard Chernick, Economics, Hunter College

Vivette Ancona, Economics, Hunter College

Fatma Cebenoyan, Accounting, Hunter College

Josh Schneiderman, English, Hunter College

Kathie Cheng, English, Hunter College

Elke Nicolai, German, Hunter College

Elizabeth Beaujour, Classical & Oriental Studies, Hunter College

Paolo Fasoli, Romance Languages Classical & Oriental Studies. Hunter College

Meena Alexander, Hunter College and Graduate Center

Jessie Liss, John Jay

Hamad Sindhi, CCNY

Susanna Roos, Graduate Center

Dirk Witteveen, Graduate Center and Queens College

Michael W. Raphael, Graduate Center and John Jay

Pilar Ortiz, Graduate Center

Tom Buechele, Graduate Center and Hunter

Simone Kolysh, Graduate Center and Brooklyn College

Scarlett Lindeman, Graduate Center

Paul Attewell, Graduate Center

Kim Cunningham, Graduate Center

Carlos M. Camacho, Graduate Center

Duygu Basaran Sahin, Graduate Center

Stephen Ruszczyck, Graduate Center

Mary Clare Lennon, Graduate Center

Omar Montana, Graduate Center and Queens College

Daniel Douglas, Graduate Center

Cathy Bork, Graduate Center

Noah Golden, Graduate Center

Sara Martucci, Graduate Center

Rati Kashyap, Graduate Center

Philip Kasinitz, Graduate Center

Dave Monahan, Graduate Center

Vandeen Campbell, Lehman College

Sarah Tosh, Brooklyn College

Tommy Wu, Queens College

Kaleela Munroe, York

Jesse Allen, Graduate Center

Gabriele Cappelleti, Graduate Center

Eric Ketcham, Lehman College

Francesco Crocco, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Racquel Goodison, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Jill Richardson, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Kelly Secovnie, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Adele Kudish, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Carlos Hernandez, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Andrew Levy, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Joe Bisz, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Paul Palven, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Lois Griffith, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Andrew Gottlieb, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Gregory Munna, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Lara Stapleton, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Margarette Connor, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Julie M. Vega, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Rolanda Jorif, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Margaret Claire Pamplin, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Rahmat Tavakol, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Gerald Schoenewolf, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Erica White, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Hemalatha Navaratne, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Charles J. Ray III, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Julius Key, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Jennifer Pinkney-Pastor, Borough of Manhattan Community College

William Roane, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Dan DePaulo, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Ting Lei, Borough of Manhattan Community College

David Caicedo, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Debra Greenwood, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Sheldon Applewhite, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Philip Weisman, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Anastassios Rigopoulos, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Jon Dash, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Cynthia Karasek, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Silvia Alvarez-Olarra, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Eda Henao, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Nidia Pulles-Linares, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Alejandro Varderi, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Kristina Varadi, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Zenon Reynarowych, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Fritz Cornely, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Emmanuel Palav, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Michael Kent, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Barb Ashton, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Estuart Rudin, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Brian Prager, Borough of Manhattan Community College and Hunter College

Juliet Emanuel, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Katherine Figueroa, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Cheryl Brown, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Nora Gold, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Susan Brillhart, Borough of Manhattan Community College

Akemi Nishida, Psych, Graduate Center

Andrew Stout, Math, Graduate Center

Nikita Miasnikov, Math, Graduate Center

Erin McKinney-Prupis, Public Health, Graduate Center

David Harvey, Graduate Center

Alejandro Alonso, Graduate Center and Brooklyn College

Erika Mazzer, Comp Lit, Graduate Center

David Himmelstein, Public Health, Graduate Center

Caroline Loomis, Earth & Environmental Sciences, Graduate Center

Rod Watts, Psych, Graduate Center

Khaled Al Hilli, Graduate Center

Betty Wolder Levin, Health & Nutrition Sciences, Brooklyn College

Diana Soriano, CCNY

Rosa Merola, NYCCT

Astrid Roldan, Lehman College

Greg Houston, Brooklyn College

Spencer Bastedo, Graduate Center

Vishnu Bisram, CUNY

Isa Vásquez, CUNY

Alan Koenig, Poli Sci, Graduate Center

Marissa Brostoff, English, Graduate Center

Bora Ferlengez, Math, Graduate Center

Jeremy Benson, Graduate Center

Ian Fernandopulle, laid off from Brooklyn College

Elan Abrell, Urban Studies, Queens College

Maggie Dickinson, Macaulay

Mikhael Simmonds, CCNY

Rishika Bajaj, Hostos

Aradhana Kumari, Math, Graduate Center

Lauren Suchman, Anthropology, Graduate Center

Erika Suffern, Renaissance Society, CUNY

Andreas Kakolyris, Graduate Center

Scott Fisher, Psych, Hunter College

Nicholas Michelli, Graduate Center

Igor Pikayzen, Music, Graduate Center

Ahmed Shamim, Graduate Center and LAGCC

Purnima Thakur, Graduate Center

Matthew Oyer, Graduate Center

Ashley Chastain, Public Health, Hunter College

Adam McMahon, Poli Sci, Hunter College

Pamela Vossenas, Graduate Center

Anders Wallace, Graduate Center

Stanley Aronowitz, Graduate Center

Fabbio Battista, Comp Lit, Graduate Center

Matilde Fogliani, Comp Lit, Graduate Center

Denisse Andrade, Geography, Graduate Center

James Sevitt, Environmental Psych, Graduate Center

S. Hooiveld, Graduate Center

Sami Al-Dhaheri, Graduate Center

Nancy Berke, LAGCC

Anne Stone, Music, Graduate Center

Juliana Karras-Jean Gilles, Psychology, Graduate Center

Michael Baker, CCNY

Cihan Karabulut, John Jay

Amy Schiller, Graduate Center

Timothy Johnson, Graduate Center and Queens College

Sarah Hesson, Urban Ed, Graduate Center

Agustin Indaco, Graduate Center

Rahul Deshmukh, Physics, Graduate Center

Osmen Dogan, Brooklyn College

Jennifer Wilkinson, Graduate Center

Carl Louis, NYCTC, Brooklyn

Sonia K. González, Public Health, Graduate Center

Lydia Brassard, Queens College

Deborah Gardner, Roosevelt House, Hunter College

Ben Hellwege, Graduate Center

Peggy Suzuki, English, Hunter College

Sara Rutkowski, English, Hunter College

David Winn, English, Hunter College

Fernando Zapata, Philosophy, Hunter College

Allannah Karas, Graduate Center

Gail Elizabeth Korn, English, Hunter College

Consuelo Martinez-Reyes, Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Hunter College

Harry Franqui, Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños, Hunter College

José Camacho, Centro, Hunter College

Marilisa Jiménez, Centro, Hunter College

Jose de Jesus, Centro, Hunter College

Kurt Brison, Centro, Hunter College

Alberto Hernández, Centro, Hunter College

James Kielkopf, Centro, Hunter College

Margarita Aguilar, Centro, Hunter College

Francesco Frova, Baruch College

Sanjay Reddy, Graduate Center

Elias J. Theodoracopoulos, Classics, Hunter College

Thomas Chen, Classics, Hunter College

Stephen Wetta, English, Hunter College

Calliope Haritos, Educational Foundations, Hunter College

Kimberly Kinsler, Educational Foundations, Hunter College

Tony Doyle, Library, Hunter College

James Regan, FDA, Hunter College

Elizabeth Sachs, Director, Ed Abroad, Hunter College

Mayra Torres, Asst. Dir., Centro, Hunter College

Noraliz Ruiz, Centro, Hunter College

Xavier Totti, Lehman College

Jack Gantzer, Education and Language Acquisition, LaGuardia

Aaron Hamilton, LaGuardia

Carole Julien, LaGuardia

Debbie Villalón, Coop Ed & Humanities, LaGuardia

George D. Sussman, Social Sciences, LaGuardia

Ana Kosok, ALC, LaGuardia

Viktoria Dudar, LaGuardia

Claudia Baldonedo, LaGuardia

Grace Malijan, LaGuardia

Suzanne Jones, LaGuardia

Howard Motoike, Natural Sciences, LaGuardia

Justin Rogers-Cooper, LaGuardia

Jason Hendrickson, English, LaGuardia

Allia Abdullah-Matta, LaGuardia

Sreca Perukovic, LaGuardia

Abdel Kadik, LaGuardia

Ann Matsuuchi, LaGuardia

Judi O’Toole, Natural Sciences, LaGuardia

Carol Haspel, Natural Sciences, LaGuardia

Faith Armstrong, Natural Sciences, LaGuardia

Rebecca Rivera-Maestre, Health Sciences, LaGuardia

Steve Lang, LaGuardia

Marzena Bugaj, LaGuardia

Silvia Lu, Library, LaGuardia

Alexandra Rojas, Library, LaGuardia

Steven Ovadia, Library, LaGuardia

Muath Obaidat, LaGuardia

Olga Calderón, Natural Sciences, LaGuardia

Cynthia Pierce, Health Sciences, LaGuardia

Maureen Doyle, Health Sciences, LaGuardia

Irene Ofiaza, Health Sciences, LaGuardia

Janette Huang, Health Sciences, LaGuardia

Samuel Kleinplatz, Humanities, LaGuardia

Dora P. Trujillo, LaGuardia/MEC

Dan Roth, LaGuardia

Julian Hernandez, ESL, LaGuardia

Maria Hart, LaGuardia

Sreedevi Ande, LaGuardia

Gordon Crandall, LaGuardia/MEC

Thomas Fink, LaGuardia

Edna Boris, English, LaGuardia

Gordon Tapper, English, LaGuardia

Stafford Gregoire, English, LaGuardia

Dean Kostos, English, LaGuardia

Mikhail A. Valentin, LaGuardia

S. Rosenberg, Health Sciences

R. Ippolito, Health Sciences, LaGuardia

M. O’Shea, Health Sciences, LaGuardia

Guadalupe Delacruz, LaGuardia

Malika Toval, LaGuardia

William Diaz Jr., LaGuardia

Bethany Jacobsen, LaGuardia

Claudia Moreno Parsons, LaGuardia Community College

Christine Marks, LaGuardia Community College

Daniel Lynch, English, LaGuardia Community College

John Silva, English, LaGuardia Community College

Gail Green-Andersen, English, LaGuardia Community College

Kristen Gallagher, LaGuardia Community College

Bethany Holmstrom, English, LaGuardia Community College

Cynthia C. Lam, English, LaGuardia Community College

Charles Perkins, ACE, LaGuardia Community College

Jenny Palios, Health Science, LaGuardia Community College

Jackie Ross, Health Science, LaGuardia Community College

Clarence Chan, Health Science, LaGuardia Community College

Marianne Cu, Health Science, LaGuardia Community College

Varvara Efremova, Health Science, LaGuardia Community College

Khalid Kassou, Math, LaGuardia Community College

Jose L. Araujo, MEC, LaGuardia Community College

Hector Martinez, Math, Bronx Community College and LaGuardia Community College

Lauretta Horton, Writing Center, LaGuardia Community College

Prabha Betne, MEC, LaGuardia Community College

Ali Abdullah, LaGuardia Community College

Gail Buksh-Jarrett, LaGuardia Community College

Monika Ekiert, LaGuardia Community College

Ruhma Choudhury, LaGuardia Community College

James Richardson, LaGuardia Community College

Marrina Dedlovskaya, LaGuardia Community College

N. Goubran, LaGuardia Community College

Richard Brown, LaGuardia Community College

Thomas Onorato, LaGuardia Community College

Arthur Simms, Humanities, LaGuardia Community College

Tim Coogan, Social Science, LaGuardia Community College

Nichole Shippen, Social Science, LaGuardia Community College

Paul Quatinetz, LaGuardia Community College

Christine Caruso, LaGuardia Community College

Christina Stang, LaGuardia Community College

Jai-ne Tilghman, Workforce Education Center, LaGuardia Community College

Michelle Sampson, Workforce Education Center, LaGuardia Community College

Vanessa R. Watson, Program for Deaf Adults, LaGuardia Community College

Yakov Shifrin, Program for Deaf Adults, LaGuardia Community College

David A. Housel, CLIP, ACE, LaGuardia Community College

Molly Fox, Social Worker, LaGuardia Community College

John Chaffee, Humanities, LaGuardia Community College

Marcus D. Allen, Associate Professor, Urban Studies, Guttman Community College

Marcia Edwards, Assistant Professor, Human Services, Guttman Community College

Carolee Ramsay, Guttman Community College

Alia Tyner, Assistant Prof./chap. chair, Guttman Community College

Anthony Gronowicz, Adjunct Assoc. Prof., BMCC

Darren Kwong, Graduate Center

Tanesha Thomas, Graduate Center

Vanessa Paul, Graduate Center

Alice Tzou, Graduate Center

Scott Schwartz, Graduate Center

Samuel Heilman, Queens College (Distinguished Professor of Sociology)

Jesse Goldstein, Hunter College

Margaret Feeley, Adj. Lecturer, English, Kingsborough Community College

John Keller, Adj. Lecturer, English, Kingsborough

Bruce Chadwick, Adj. Professor, English, Kingsborough

Tara Thompson, English, Kingsborough

Eric Rothenberg, Business, Kingsborough

Steven Janowsky, Lecturer, English, Kingsborough

Samantha Sierra, Kingsborough

Reabeka King, Kingsborough

Arelis Martinez, Kingsborough

Marie McGovern, Kinsgborough

Elizabeth Dill, Kingsborough

Sue Carpenter, Asst. Prof., Behavioral Sciences, Kingsborough

Heidi Lopez, Single Stop, Kingsborough

M. Schlesinger, Academic Affairs, Kingsborough

M. Cummings, English, Kingsborough

L. Garland, History, Kingsborough

Y. Solovieva, English, Kingsborough

E. Esdaille, English, Kingsborough

Geraldo Vasquez, Guttman Community College

Ariana Gonzalez Stokas, Guttman Community College

Parviz Kermani, Guttman Community College

Naveen Seth, Guttman Community College

Julie Saltzman, Guttman Community College

 

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